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Future of Iraq

Iraqis walk across the al-Ahrar bridge over the Tigris river in the center of Baghdad
(AP/WWP)
A Kurdish man shops at Mazi supermarket in the northern Iraqi city of Dohuk
A Kurdish man shops at Mazi supermarket in the northern Iraqi city of Dohuk, November 22, 2000. (AP/WWP)
  • Iraqi-Americans Discuss Future of Iraq
    18 June, Washington Prominent members of the Iraqi-American community said they believe the potential exists for successful political and social reform in Iraq, provided the fragmented opposition is able to more effectively combine its efforts. A unified opposition organization, they said, would be capable of surmounting the barriers, which have so far prevented the Iraqi public from taking action against Saddam Hussein. Complete Text

  • Iraqi Opposition Holds Seminar on Democratic Change in Iraq
    30 May, Washington Opening a two-day seminar on "Prospects for Democratic Change in Iraq," Hussain Sinjari, the president of the Iraq Institute for Democracy, told participants that democracy and liberty would eventually be achieved in all of Iraq. Complete Text

University of Sulaymaniyah students 2001
University of Sulaymaniyah students 2001. (Michael Rubin)
  • Encouraging Iraqi Civic Participation Can Spread Hope
    8 April, Washington There exists an "untapped resource" of Iraqi civic participation which, if activated, can encourage a message of hope to counter the fear spread by the regime of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, according to Laith Kubba, senior program officer for the Middle East at the National Endowment for Democracy (NED). Complete Text



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