Search  
   
Good Morning America World News Tonight 20/20 Primetime Nightline WNN This Week
March 29, 2003
 
HOMEPAGE
NEWS SUMMARY
US
INTERNATIONAL
MONEYScope
WEATHER
LOCAL NEWS
ENTERTAINMENT
ESPN SPORTS
SCI / TECH
POLITICS
HEALTH
TRAVEL
FEATURED SERVICES
RELATIONSHIPS
SHOPPING
DOWNLOADS
WIRELESS
INTERACT
VIDEO & AUDIO
BOARDS
CHAT
NEWS ALERTS
CONTACT ABC
ABCNEWS.com
Pakistanis Plead Not Guilty to U.S. Mission Attack

Reuters


Print This Page
Email This Page
See Most Sent
EXCLUSIVE: Blair Says No Surprises in Iraq
U.S. Losing Battle for Arab Public Opinion
Military Spouses Finds Ways to Stay in Touch
March 29

KARACHI (Reuters) - Five Islamic militants pleaded not guilty on Saturday to killing 12 people in a car bomb attack on the U.S. consulate in the Pakistani city of Karachi last June, a defense lawyer said.

The five accused were brought before a special anti-terrorism court at Karachi's central jail and charged with murder, attempted murder, terrorism and use of explosives.

All are members of al-Almi, an offshoot of the radical Harkat-ul-Mujahideen organization, which is accused both of masterminding the June 14 consulate bombing and conspiring to kill President Pervez Musharraf.

Three of the five suspects -- Mohammad Imran, Mohammad Hanif and Mohammad Ashraf -- were put on trial in August but the judge decided to restart the case when two more were arrested. They are the alleged ringleader, identified as Shahib Arslan, and Zubair Ahmed.

"All the five accused pleaded not guilty and had told the court that they are falsely implicated in the case," Abdul Waheed Katpar, one of the defense lawyers, told reporters outside the Karachi central prison.

The hearing was adjourned till April 7, he added.

The car bomb exploded outside the consulate and all the victims were Pakistanis. At least 20 people were wounded.

Harkat-ul-Mujahideen has long been on a U.S. blacklist of terrorist organizations and reportedly has links to Muslim separatists fighting Indian rule in the disputed Kashmir region.

Islamic militant groups have been incensed by Pakistan's decision to turn its back on the Taliban in Afghanistan and support the U.S.-led war on terror after the attacks on the United States last year.

Copyright 2003 Reuters News Service. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 
 
RealOne (Ad Served by Avenue A)
  RELATED STORIES
International Index
More Raw News
 
 INTERNATIONAL HEADLINES
Major Battles Expected Outside Baghdad
Iraqi Family Caught in Crossfire
Biochem Threat Takes a Toll
Iraq General Could Launch Chemical Attacks
Blair: There Has Been No Surprises in Iraq

 


Copyright 2003 ABCNEWS Internet Ventures.
Click here for:  HELP   ADVERTISER INFO   CONTACT ABC   TOOLS   PR   TERMS OF USE   PRIVACY POLICY

Family of sites:      ABC.com        ABC Family        ESPN.com        Disney.com        FamilyFun.com        GO Mail        Movies.com