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April 11, 2003
 
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(AP Photo)
Key Developments in the War Against Iraq
Key Developments in the War Against Iraq

The Associated Press


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Key developments Friday in the war in Iraq:

U.S.-led forces expanded their control over Iraq as Mosul, largest city in the north, fell without a fight. But looting erupted and U.S. special forces were called in.

Barefoot and wearing civilian clothes, young Iraqi fighters marched away from battle, abandoning Mosul without firing a shot.

Saddam Hussein's hometown of Tikrit is the last major holdout of his regime, but no major troops units remain in the country, the Pentagon said.

President Bush, declining to declare victory, said that he doesn't know whether Saddam Hussein is dead or alive but "I know he's no longer in power."

Lawlessness and lingering pockets of resistance to American forces prolonged Baghdad's suffering. Hundreds of residents have been killed, the city is without power, and the supply of water is irregular.

Gen. Tommy Franks instructs U.S. troops to ensure that public services and religious institutions continue to operate in the Iraqi capital.

Kurdish fighters will leave oil-rich Kirkuk when enough American troops arrive to take over, said a senior Kurdish leader.

The U.S. military issued a most-wanted list in the form of a deck of cards, with Saddam Hussein as the ace of spades, to help troops identify top Iraqi fugitives.

Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld characterized looting in Iraq as a period of "untidiness" and suggested it was only a transitional phase on the way to freedom.

Since reaching Baghdad, U.S. Marines have been doing their own kind of looting grabbing Iraqi pistols, rifles, uniforms and pictures of Saddam Hussein. Now they've been ordered to dump what they took or lose their rank.

President Vladimir Putin said he welcomed the fall of Saddam Hussein, but called the U.S.-led war in Iraq illegitimate and a threat to international law.

The International Committee of the Red Cross said it doesn't know the whereabouts of the seven U.S. prisoners of war or who in Iraq is responsible for them.

U.S. soldiers found the personal weapons cache of Saddam Hussein's son Odai, including boxes of assault rifles and dozens of ceremonial firearms in an abandoned house in Baghdad.


photo credit and caption:
A truck loaded with furniture looted from one of Saddam Hussein's presidential palaces rides past a destroyed communication center in Baghdad Friday, April 11, 2003. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

Copyright 2003 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 
 
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